Leon Uris and Love of Country

Fifty-one years ago – nearly to the day – I read Leon Uris’s novel of Berlin in the aftermath of WWII, Armageddon.  I still retain that first edition though the dustcover no longer exists.  I read the book over a weekend in the spring of my senior year at the United States Air Force Academy.  I am a slow reader, but I devoured this 632-page novel in two days, a personal record. Continue reading Leon Uris and Love of Country

Chapter Six, The Last Jew in Vinnitsa

I read this morning – March 6, 2022 – that the Russians have completely destroyed the Vinnytsia [Vinnitsa] Regional Airport in Ukraine.  Whenever I hear the name of the town – Vinnitsa – I think of this photo.  It has been many years since I first discovered this photo.  Five years ago, I wrote this post.  I have quoted Holocaust survivor and the late Elie Wiesel many times.  I am compelled to do it again… Continue reading Chapter Six, The Last Jew in Vinnitsa

A Light in the Heart of Darkness

I do not routinely engage in social media.  Several weeks ago, my daughter Stef – who does – called to tell me a person in England reached out asking if she was related to the “E.S. Kraay” who wrote The Hamsa.  Understanding my ineptitude with social media, Stef explained to me how I could respond to the inquiry on ‘messenger.’  An hour or so later, I was talking to my new friend in England, Pat Easton.

Pat Easton

Pat is a proud member of the Great British Home Chorus Friends [GBHCF], a virtual choir that evolved from the COVID lockdown in the UK last year. Continue reading A Light in the Heart of Darkness